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Our Curriculum

 

 Below you can expand each subject to find more about what it looks like at Abbotsweld Primary Academy...

Art

 

Purpose, Aims and Intent

At NET Academies, our art curriculum, seeks to combine the acquisition of progressive key practical skills alongside the development and understanding of critical creative thinking, and a contextual element of significant and inspirational Artworks, Artists, Movements and Genres. 

These contextual references will combine examples from both the world of British and International art and design, and diverse cultural references.

  

Each project undertaken will have opportunities for independent creative thinking, critical problem solving and cross curricular links. Our young artists will learn the importance and application of the foundation elements and principles of the arts and craft:

  • Form;
  • Pattern;
  • Shape;
  • Tone;
  • Texture;
  • Colour.

 

They will experiment with and develop mastery in the key processes of art; Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, 3d Design and Textiles.

Pupils will experiment with an extensive range of both traditional and innovative/alternative materials to produce personal creative responses to a range of stimuli. They will enjoy both collaborative and independent success and will participate in community-based projects that have a wider impact than their immediate locality. Skills and experience gained in the educational setting will inspire independent exploration and development outside of the classroom. Pupils will develop the skills to apply creativity in many cross curricular contexts and settings.

By the end of Key Stage 2 NET pupils will have undertaken a significant range of creative experiences and will have the practical skills and creative confidence to embark on the next stage of their creative journey.

 

Based on the National Curriculum, the intent for both key stages 1 and 2 are as follows: 

Key stage 1 Pupils should be taught:  

  • - to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products 
  • - to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination 
  • - to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space 
  • - about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work. 

Key stage 2 Pupils should be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.  

Pupils should be taught:

  • - to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas 
  • - to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay] 
  • - about great artists, architects and designers in history

 

Organisation of the Curriculum

There are 3 units per year for Years 1 to 6.
The focus in EYFS is the exploration and experimentation with a wide range of exciting and interesting materials to support children’s imaginative and creative responses. This will be facilitated in the EYFS setting, as well as during specialist lessons which introduce the children to more complex media, with the aim to ignite their curiosity further and support how they interact with creative mediums.   
The Art, Craft and Design Curriculum will be taught alternating half terms by an Art Specialist Faciliatator.

Planning and Assessment

Planning is progressive across the year groups and to support long term memory skill domains are consistent and revisited throughout each key stage and each unit has learning questions. These learning questions follows the art specific sequence…

 

Carefully chosen units of work have a clear rationale for their positioning within the curriculum programme of study. This is set out in our ‘why here, why now documentation’. Vocabulary, skills and knowledge are explicitly planned for in each unit overview.

Pupils are supported in knowing, remembering, understanding and applying this through knowledge organisers, our teaching and learning policy/cycle and sequenced learning questions.

Ongoing skill assessment will be used within the unit as well as the final outcome. This is done by the teacher.

 

Enrichment

All pupils from EYFS have access to a specialist Art Studio and use a sketchbook from Year 1 upwards. We encourage all pupils to engage in art enrichment activities that are scattered across the year including local community events such as Harlow card competitions for our MP and Menorah designing as well as The Big Draw run by Kapow, which celebrates the power of drawing and mark making.

 

Computing

Purpose, Aims and Intent

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world

At NET, the aim of our Computing curriculum is to ensure that all pupils:

·Explore the concepts of computational thinking–logical reasoning, algorithmic thinking, decomposition, pattern recognition, abstraction, and evaluation–gaining an understanding that these problem-solving skills can be using in computing, across the curriculum, and throughout their lives.

·Understand what algorithms are and how they can be implemented as programs on digital devices.

·Can use computational thinking skills to design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals.

·Can use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly.

·Develop the ability to become digital creators not just digital consumers. Being able to select, use and combine a variety of software [...] to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals

 

Based on the National Curriculum, the intent for both key stages 1 and 2 are as follows:

Key stage 1 Pupils should be taught to:

  • - understand what algorithms are, how they are implemented as programs on digital devices, and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • - create and debug simple programs
  • - use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  • - use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content
  • - recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
  • - use technology  safely  and  respectfully, keeping personal  information private; identify  where  to  go  for  help  and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies

 

Key stage 2 Pupils should be taught to:

  • - design, write  and  debug  programs  that  accomplish  specific  goals,  including  controlling  or  simulating  physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • - use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; [use]variables and various forms of input and output
  • - use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • - understand computer networks, including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the World Wide Web, and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • - use search  technologies  effectively,  appreciate  how  results are  selected  and  ranked,  and  be  discerning  in evaluating digital content
  • - select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information
  • - use technology  safely,  respectfully  and  responsibly;  recognise  acceptable/unacceptable  behaviour;  identify  a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact

 

Organisation of the curriculum

At NET Academies, pupils as computer scientists will have the opportunity to develop skills in the following areas:

  • - Computer Science
  • - Information Technology
  • - Digital Literacy

There are also four strands in computing that continue throughout the whole curriculum.

 

Each year group completes 6 computing units over the course of the year. This equates to one each half term and ensures coverage of the national curriculum.

These lessons are taught discretely but where links can be made to non-core units being taught they will be.

 

Computing may not be part of the EYFS Statutory Framework, but there is much that goes on in the EYFS that provides a foundation for computational thinking – the golden thread that runs through Computing in the National curriculum.

In the Statutory Framework for EYFS, the early learning goal from the ‘technology’ strand in the ‘understanding the world’ area of learning, requires that, ‘children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools’. This is about helping children to understand their place in a world that seems increasingly dominated by technology. We need to help them make sense of this world, as well as planting the seeds for their understanding of the implications of technology in their lives and society. This is the start of ‘digital literacy’ and it extends into Key Stage 1, where children are taught to ‘recognise common uses of information technology beyond school’. Early Years practitioners provide a rich environment in which children can build up an understanding of the world through play. They help children to be curious about technology in real world contexts. Through role-play and natural discussions like these the children make sense of their world.

 

Planning and Assessment

Planning is progressive across the year groups and to support long term memory skill strands of computing are consistent and revisited throughout each key stage and each unit has learning questions.

These learning questions follows the computing specific sequence:

 

Carefully chosen units of work have a clear rationale for their positioning within the curriculum programme of study. This is set out in our ‘why here, why now documentation’. Vocabulary, skills and knowledge are explicitly planned for in each unit overview.

Pupils are supported in knowing, remembering, understanding and applying this through knowledge organisers, our teaching and learning policy/cycle and sequenced learning questions.

Ongoing skill assessment will be used within the unit as well as the final outcome to show learning. This is done by the class teacher.

Enrichment

All pupils from EYFS to KS2 have access to devices ranging from ipads to chrome books.

STEM learning

Clubs

Design Technology

Purpose and Aims

In a world where jobs and careers that pupils will be training to be part of, have not yet been invented, we want to create a design and technology curriculum that stands the test of time. Our curriculum equips pupils with the necessary skills to become resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens in an ever demanding, and increasingly technological world. The future of work is the work of imagination and the design technology curriculum allows our pupils to not only imagine but to create.

Design and Technology is an inspiring, practical subject that provides pupils with an uninhibited opportunity to use their creativity and imagination to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems. Part of the design and technology curriculum encourages children’s empathy of others through considerations, not only of their own wants and values, but those of others in their community. Pupils will be asked to evaluate past and present design and technology so that they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world.

Pupils will acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw upon disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. They will develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently.

Planning and Assessment

The curriculum follows the Kapow Primary scheme of work and has been strengthened so that pupils revisit the learning in a spiral continuum curriculum. Pupils revisit strands and skills again, each time covering the same strand but with greater complexity and depth. As the pupils return to a previous strand prior learning is utilised, providing pupils with the foundations, and building blocks, in order to retain new information in the long term memory.

As the curriculum is revisited it is set out into strands that pupils will be exposed to throughout their primary years. The key areas are:

  • Structures
  • Mechanism/Mechanical Systems
  • Cooking Nutrition
  • Textiles
  • Electrical Systems
  • Digital World

Each area is visited once a year by children, with Electrical Systems and the Digital World starting in KS2. Within each area the pupils will gain an insight into structures and their principles and functionality. They will learn about specific techniques associated with the area of learning. They will build on vocabulary and make reference to symbols. Knowledge Organisers for these areas have been created to support pupil’s prior and future learning.

Domains have been designed to run alongside the National Curriculum requirements. These skills are:

  • Design
  • Make
  • Evaluate
  • Technical Knowledge

These skills enable pupils to develop creative, technical and practical expertise necessary in order to become confident in design and technology. They use knowledge and gain new understanding in order to refine their products and analyse their productivity. They are able to be self-reflective and critique their products, testing their theories and ideas as they work. The skills progression document formulated by Kapow Primary and enhanced by NET is used to ensure pupils have a balanced curriculum, with skills developing and interwoven throughout the primary phase.

In addition to this, pupils are able to understand the key components of nutrition, healthy living and how to create balanced meals.

Pupils follow a sequence of learning, starting with a big introduction, where they evaluate existing products. They then progress onto a sequence of lessons which allow pupils the opportunity to develop skills through a focus task, designing and making their product before evaluating against the intent and purpose.

 

 

Units are taught discretely but where links can be made to topics being taught they are, in order that pupils make meaningful connections whilst building up knowledge in their long term memory.

Organisation of the Curriculum

The Design and Technology curriculum is an exciting practical subject which can be found in many of the day to day objects pupils use. Design and technology is a part of children’s immediate experiences.  

By the time a pupil leaves KS2 at NET, they will be able to:

  • use their knowledge, understanding and skills to solve real and relevant problems
  • use innovation and imagination to design and make products
  • work as individuals and as part of a team, communicating their ideas through, models, diagrams and templates
  • use practical skills and technical knowledge to improve products
  • take risks with their design project in order to become enterprising citizens via the evaluation of products.

 

Enrichment

By enriching the curriculum we hope to provide extended learning opportunities for our children. Giving the pupil the chance to study concepts with greater depth, breadth and complexity, while also helping pupils to pursue their own areas of interest and strength.

Enrichment happens in the following ways:

Trips and Workshops: Workshops are designed to give our pupils some hands-on experience of designing and making in the real world. In addition to our workshops within school, pupils have also had the chance to visit places of interest such as the Science Museum

Home Learning and Competitions: Our pupils are given opportunities to apply their D.T. skills more independently by working on projects at home and with their families. We have held several competitions where pupils are challenged to create a range of free-standing structures at home, such as houses and landmarks.

Design Technology Opportunities: As part of all of our D.T. topics, pupils are given the chance to explore and experiment with different materials, skills and techniques. They are encouraged to practise the skills they have learned and taught to evaluate, adapt and improve their ideas over a period of time. This begins right away in our EYFS unit, where pupils have access to a wide range of tools and materials to explore in our continuous provision.

English- Reading, excluding Phonics

 

Purpose, Aims and Intent: 

Reading is at the heart of classroom teaching at NET Academies. Our aim is for children to become confident and independent readers who have a love of reading for pleasure and gain pleasure and insight from reading. Competence enables enjoyment and appreciation of literature and access to a world of information. Reading experiences at Abbotsweld  include (but are not exclusive to):  

  • daily phonics sessions* for children in EYFS and KS1 (*see separate NET Phonics guidance) and catch-up phonics for lower KS2 
  • Whole Class reading (upper KS1 and KS2 daily) 
  • shared reading in subjects across the curriculum (daily, as appropriate)  
  • sustained silent reading sessions - independent reading (daily) 
  • comprehension sessions (weekly) 
  • engaging and organised classroom book corners 
  • author of the month 

 

Vision and ethos: 

  • All pupils to read fluently and with good understanding. 
  • All pupils to enjoy listening to, and reading, a range of genres, including poems and non-fiction texts.   
  • Pupils to acquire a rich vocabulary, plus knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language. 
  • Pupils to use discussion to learn and clearly explain their understanding and ideas linked to what they read. 
  • Pupils are given varied opportunities to read a range of genres, and discuss what they read, using the broad aims of the National Curriculum: reading quality texts, using what they read as writing stimulus and incorporating increasingly sophisticated vocabulary.  
  • Staff and children have high expectations and positive mindsets that everyone can achieve well.  

 

How do we approach depth of learning? 

We aim to teach children to read a variety of genres of increasing complexity as they move through the school, to use rich vocabulary, and become skilled at discussing and writing about what they read.   

We do this through a process of: 

  • Quality texts for whole class reading stories, led by the teacher.  
  • Use of a reading spine for guided and reciprocal reading, to ensure covering of all genres, including non-fiction. 
  • Varied, challenging books and texts for small group reciprocal reading in KS1, with a focus on fluency and vocabulary. 
  • Varied, challenging books and texts in guided reading sessions (Upper KS1 and KS2) with a focus on fluency and vocabulary, using a range of genres, to include non-fiction, repeating whole class reading texts studied in the previous year group.  
  • Use of reading book marks during whole class reading. 
  • Dedicated weekly comprehension sessions (twice weekly in upper KS2), in which a range of skills, with an emphasis on inference, prediction and summary, are taught.  
  • Consistency in planning to ensure progression in knowledge and skills.  
  • Assessment procedures to identify strengths and areas for development and for cross-curricular and wider opportunities to encourage children to read across the curriculum daily.  

How do we support children experiencing difficulty? 

  • Intervention groups for children working below age related expectations (SEND): ‘Catch Up Reading’ in KS2 and ‘Breaking Barriers’ in KS1 and extra phonics sessions (see separate guidance). 
  • Teacher-led flexible interventions for children (not on SEND list) who need more time to practise.   
  • Booster groups in Years 5 and 6 for children identified as falling behind - lead by the Lead Practitioner/HT. 
  • PPA time with other teachers and support from Trust Leads.  
  • Reading buddy system, identifying the bottom 20% to ensure daily practise. 

Planning and Assessment:  

  • Reading schemes. 
  • Ongoing formative assessments – reading target sheets in the front of Reading Response books. 
  • Termly summative assessments (using PIRA from Year 1 to Year 6).   
  • DCPro (online tracking) to record assessment each term.  
  • Pupil progress meetings – tracking progress from previous Key Stage and within the current academic year.  
  • PPA sessions used to share informal assessments, what is going well and any barriers to learning. 
  • Moderation across key stages, monitored across the Trust by the Lead Practitioners.  

 

 

 

Enrichment: 

  • Developing more meaningful uses of English during non-core and science lessons.  
  • Embedding IT to enrich English. For example, Spelling Shed to increase pupils’ engagement with weekly spellings.  
  • Develop the use of tiered vocabulary, through the Vocabulary Toolkit, with staff and pupils to have an explicit understanding.  
  • Embed reading for pleasure across the school - special events and days.
  • Developing the use of Oracy/P4C and Drama within non-core subjects - a through school approach.  

 

English- Phonics

Purpose, Aims and Intent:  

Reading is at the heart of classroom teaching at NET Academies. Our aim is for children to become confident and independent readers who have a love of reading for pleasure and gain pleasure and insight from reading. Competence enables enjoyment and appreciation of literature and access to a world of information.  

Organisation of the Curriculum : 

  • We work towards all pupils to pass Phonic Screening in Year 1 
  • All pupils to have a secure understanding and recall of all speed sounds by Autumn half-term in Year 2. 
  • All pupils to read fluently and with good understanding at the end of KS1. 
  • All staff have regular RWI training  
  • RWI techniques embedded within all lessons 
  • Staff and children have high expectations and positive mindsets that everyone can achieve well.  

How do we support children experiencing difficulty? 

  • extra phonics sessions  
  • one to one sessions 
  • pre-teaching of new sounds. 
  • Regular exposure to sounds taught (Pinny-time)  

 

  • Planning and Assessment: 
  • Half-termly assessment formal assessments
  • Ad-hoc, when ready, Phonics Leader assessments of individuals
  • Teacher assessment 

 

What can typically be seen during RWI sessions?  

  • Consistent approach throughout all group levels/sessions 
  • Daily speed sound session 
  • Word time  
  • Reading of Red words  
  • Reading of Story words (Red, Speedy Green and Story Green words) 
  • Partner practice 
  • Shared reading 
  • Teacher modelling of reading 

Enrichment: 

  • INSET meetings lead by RWI Lead 
  • P4C/Oracy Curriculum 
  • Weekly training sessions 
  • Team teaching sessions 
  • Lesson observations with feedback 

 

English- Writing

 

At NET Academies, we have developed a bespoke English Writing curriculum based on engaging quality books and texts and the sharing of best practice and feedback from teachers. We draw influences from current pedagogy combined with evidence-based research (e.g. Talk for Writing) to develop sequences of lessons which meet the requirements of the National Curriculum but are also tailored to meet the needs of each cohort and the individuals within it.   

 

Vision and ethos: 

  • Read fluently and with good understanding, in order to aid writing.  
  • Write clearly, accurately and coherently, for varied contexts and audiences across the curriculum.  
  • Acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and punctuation and the knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language. 
  • Use cursive, neatly joined handwriting by the end of KS1.  
  • Use discussion to learn and clearly explain their understanding and ideas. 
  • Be competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making informal and formal presentations and participate in debate.   
  • English writing is taught with an emphasis on developing children’s writing ‘toolkit’ through building their grammatical and punctuation knowledge year on year, following the English Curriculum.  
  • All children are given varied opportunities to apply this knowledge in a range of genres using the broad aims of the National Curriculum: reading quality texts, using what they read as writing stimulus and incorporating increasingly sophisticated vocabulary, sentence-structure, grammar and punctuation.  
  • Staff and children have high expectations and positive mindsets that all can achieve well.  

 

How do we approach depth of learning? 

We aim to teach children to use a rich vocabulary and become skilled at using the full range of grammatical features for their year group in a wide range of genres and contexts, to enable them to use their writing skills across the curriculum.  

We do this through a process of: 

  • Varied opportunities for children to write in a range of genres and for a range of purpose including fiction and non-fiction.    
  • Medium term planning which focusses mainly on one book or text for a sustained period to allow children time to refine and embed writing skills, new grammar and vocabulary.  
  • Assessment procedures to identify strengths and areas for development. 
  • Spiralling within the curriculum to allow time to revisit and refine grammatical features, vocabulary, sentence structure etc.  
  • Writing based on a range of talk for writing and oracy focused tasks.  
  • Consistency in planning to ensure progression in knowledge and skills.  
  • Cross-curricular and wider opportunities to encourage children to apply writing skills across the broader curriculum. Examples of this include Shakespeare week, 500 words competition, school spelling bee, world book day, poetry competitions, Roald Dahl day, around the world week.  

 

What can typically be seen during English lessons? 

  • A grammar-specific and vocabulary focus and expectation for children to use precise language e.g. when answering questions, with talk partners and discussions of misconceptions. 
  • A ‘Talk for Writing’ approach with repeated oral rehearsal of sentences.  
  • A move away from fixed grouping or labelling children by perceived ability.   
  • Challenge on display. 
  • Support in the form of a ‘top down’ model. How can we help the majority of children achieve the age-related objectives without limiting the concepts being learned?  
  • Increased opportunities for children to rehearse key skills and embed fluency. Through daily grammar focus, weekly comprehension lessons, curriculum focused comprehension.  
  • Working walls relating to recent areas of learning.  
  • Consistently applied spelling scheme – No Nonsense – taught two or three times per week and embedded within lessons.  
  • All displays use Letterjoin to encourage cursive writing, displaying key vocabulary in all curriculum areas to assist writing.  

English LTP

How do we support children experiencing difficulty? 

  • Intervention groups for children working below age related expectations (SEND). 
  • Teacher-led flexible interventions for children (not on SEND list) who need more time to practise basic writing skills (eg, by using visual coding).   
  • Quality First Teaching- using well planned scaffolding 

 

How do we assess and track progress? 

  • Ongoing formative assessments – target sheets in the front of all pupils’ books. 
  • Termly writing moderation meetings involving all NET Academy Harlow schools.  
  • Termly summative assessments (GAPS) to give standardised data.   
  • DCPro (online tracking) to record Teacher Assessment and standardised scores each term.  
  • Pupil progress meetings – tracking progress from previous Key Stage and within the current academic year.  
  • Book looks/Pupil Book Studies. 
  • Weekly spelling tests.  
  • PPA sessions used to share pupils’ books, informal assessments, what’s going well and any barriers to learning. 
 

Geography

 

  • Purpose and Aims 

The geography curriculum at Katherines inspires pupils to have a curiosity and fascination 

about the diverse world in which they live, that will develop and grow, with them, in an ever evolving society. The curriculum equips pupils with knowledge about varied places, people, resources and natural and human environments. Pupils are enabled to make considered opinions together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes, including the interaction between the two. Pupils will use their geographical knowledge to make connections and rationalise how people and places are interconnected and change over time. 

 

We have ensured that the curriculum fits the context of the school ensuring: 

 

  • UK and European cultural understanding in its widest form, 
  • the national curriculum for KS1 and KS2 is covered and surpassed, and 
  • a reduction and ultimately eradication of stereotyping of the world within human geography. 

 

Planning and Assessment 

The geography curriculum at Abbotsweld, has been designed to impart essential knowledge which is planned progressively, through the NET curriculum, across key stage one and two. This planned knowledge includes vocabulary and concepts. The concepts build upon one another year after year and refer to one another overtime. Each geography unit has a unit overview document which details the topic name, geographical strand, key skills, prior knowledge, core vocabulary and knowledge to be embedded. 

All aspects of the geogrpahy curriculum are covered throughout a pupils’ time in their key stage. We ensure that learning is meaningful, ambitious, and has progression through each year and across each year group. Each academic year we start locally, in a familiar context (in upper key stage 2 this includes Europe) and move outwards into the wider world.  

 

Geography is spilt into four repeating strands that continue throughout the whole curriculum. These are as follows:  

Locational Knowledge   

Within this strand pupils learn about: the world’s seven continents and oceans; countries and capital cities of the UK and within Europe,  environmental and geographical regions, key topographical features and land-use patterns, and how these aspects have changed over time, human and physical characteristics, including the lines of latitude, longitude and time zones    

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork 

Within this strand pupils learn about: geographical information (maps, atlases, globes and GIS) to locate countries and describe features studied; using compass directions, four and six figure grid references, symbols and keys; using locational/ directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map; recognising landmarks and human and physical features; creating maps; using fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods. 

Human & Physical Geography  

Within this strand pupils learn about: seasonal and weather patterns in the UK and hot/cold areas of the world, geographical vocabulary, describing and understanding key aspects of physical and human geography. 

Place Knowledge  

Within this strand pupils learn about: regions located in the UK and around the world, similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of different regions. 

 

As a geographer, pupils will have the opportunity to develop skills in the following domains: 

  • Geographical enquiry 
  • Direction/ Location (Compass points, following directions, grid references).  
  • Using and drawing maps. 
  • Map knowledge Representation (Symbols/ Use of a Key) Style of maps. 

 

Pupils follow a sequence of learning, starting with an idea or question and learn new knowledge in detail through enquiry, culminating in a demonstration of knowledge learnt within the unit. 

 

Unit Overviews and Knowledge Organisers have been created to assist with planning and lesson sequences. A wide range of physical and virtual resources are used to support with the pupil's learning. 

Organisation of the Curriculum 

The aim of our geography curriculum is to equip children with skills and knowledge. 

By the time a pupil leaves KS2 at NET, they will be able to: 

  • develop contextual knowledge about the location of globally significant places, including those in the UK. 
  • have an understanding of the world’s physical geography, using the correct vocabulary. 
  • interpret a wide range of geographical information as well as collecting, analysing and presenting their own information. 
  • understanding human and physical geography and how this can affect the planet, including how their own actions affect change. 
  • understand their local area compared to a region in the world. 
  • demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geography of the chosen regions of the world 

 

Enrichment 

By enriching the curriculum we hope to provide extended learning opportunities for our pupils. Giving the pupil the chance to study concepts with greater depth, breadth and complexity, while also helping children to pursue their own areas of interest and strength.  

Enrichment happens in the following ways: 

Local Study: In both key stages there is a local area study which will allow the children in KS1 to explore their local school site and surrounding area. In KS2 the pupils will look at the local river (River Stort) and follow its journey, including the physical and human geography along the way.  

Cross Curricular Links: Within PE pupils are encouraged to compete in orienteering and map work activities, using compasses and grid references. In Art, pupils learn about cultures from across the world. 

50 Things: At Abbotsweld pupils complete 100 things through their time in the primary school. Activities such as learning their address, camping out, and building shelters are part of the programme that pupils take part in.  

Home Learning: Pupils can explore geography topics and units through their homework grids which provide opportunities for pupils to embed and enhance knowledge learnt in school. 

 

 History

 

 

Purpose, Aims and Intent  

At NET, our History curriculums aims to ensure that all pupils: 

  • Have a secure chronological understanding of local, British and World History from the Stone Age up to the present day. 
  • Understand historical domains by carrying out their own historical enquiries, recognising similarities and differences, drawing contrasts, asking and answering questions. 
  • Can articulate how a significant event/person, leader, civilisation, movement (migration/invasion) and modern history have impacted society (strands). 
  • Evaluate and analyse a range of primary and secondary sources.
  • Can collate all of their acquired knowledge and understanding to form their own opinions, and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives. 
  • Gain a historically grounded understanding of abstract and subject specific terms, and be able to use these confidently

Impart essential knowledge that has been planned progressively, through the NET curriculum, across key stage one and two. This planned knowledge will include vocabulary and concepts. The concepts will build upon one another year after year and refer to one another over time. The knowledge will be mainly teacher led.  Once the essential knowledge has been facilitated, teachers will plan a creative question to explore or task to complete (using careful guidance from the NET curriculum). This will most likely be differentiated through SOLO Taxonomy, which is how much you draw upon other essential knowledge to gain an opinion or answer. After exploration Blooms Taxonomy high order thinking skills will be the basis of a well-planned outcome activity where pupils will show their understanding of what they have learnt. Each history unit has a unit overview document which details the topic name, historical strand, prior knowledge, core vocabulary and knowledge to be embedded.  

Organisation of the Curriculum  

Each year group has units to teach from Years 1 to 6. These follow the History Skills Domains. The skills domains, chorological understanding, Interpreting Evidence, Asks Questions, Understanding the impact of an event/person on society.  These lessons are taught discretely but there is scope for each unit to be compared with others, for children to deepen their understanding and make vital historical links across periods. The curriculum has been written in order to support pupils to build their knowledge and to apply that knowledge as skills.   

The focus in EYFS is understanding past and present. The context relates to the pupils themselves and then spreads wider to family and changes within the family unit. The past and present theme continues with chronological order. Links are made with old and new technologies, sequencing life events as well as identifying environmental changes over time.  

 

Planning and Assessment  

Planning is progressive across the year groups and to support long term memory skill domains are consistent and revisited throughout each key stage and each unit has learning questions. 

 

Carefully chosen units of work have a clear rationale for their positioning within the curriculum programme of study. This is set out in our ‘why here, why now documentation’. Vocabulary, skills and knowledge are explicitly planned for in each unit overview. Pupils are supported in knowing, remembering, understanding and applying this through knowledge organisers, our teaching and learning policy/cycle and sequenced learning questions. 

Enrichment  

Pupils are provided with historical based educational visits.  School based workshops are planned to further deepen knowledge.  

Mathematics

 

Purpose, aims and intent 

The maths curriculum provides children with a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject. Through varied and increasingly complex problems, children learn that mathematics is a creative and inter-connected discipline that encourages enquiry, depth of thought and perseverance. 

 

As mathematicians, pupils at the end of key stage two will be able to: 

  • Work fluently and accurately with the fundamentals of mathematics. 
  • Reason mathematically to develop a coherent justification of their ideas using relevant mathematical language. 
  • Solve problems with increasing levels of sophistication by breaking them down into a series of simpler steps. 
  • Approach unfamiliar concepts with a positive mindset, determination and the confidence to learn from mistakes.  

 

Organisation of the curriculum 

The curriculum follows the EYFS Statutory Framework and the National Curriculum objectives.  

Learning follows a series of ‘small steps’ designed to build conceptual knowledge incrementally across each Key Stage. 

From EYFS upwards, mathematics is taught conceptually to develop a deeper level of understanding; not just the application of algorithms or memorisation of facts. 

Spiralling within the curriculum allows opportunities to apply and refine concepts in new contexts and subject specific vocabulary builds and extends within and across units. 

  Mathematics LTP

Planning and assessment 

Short term planning follows a series of incremental ‘small steps’ based on the White Rose scheme of learning. Planning is adapted within each cohort in order to meet and challenge the varying needs of learners working at a range of levels.  

Formative assessments include fluency challenges, mental maths and calculation sessions. The outcome of these encourages children to reflect upon the progress they are making alongside the areas they can develop further in the future. Children are encouraged to view learning as an ongoing process and not an event. 

Termly summative assessments are used to track children’s progress. This is enhanced with gap analysis tools to allow subsequent lessons to be planned based on children’s areas for development.  

 

Enrichment 

Units of learning in all year groups aim to follow a ‘concrete, pictorial, abstract’ approach to reveal concepts using a variety of resources, images and contexts that appeal to a range of learning styles. 

Maths lessons are designed to be interactive and encourage children to be active learners through discussion, collaboration and refinement of their ideas. 

Where appropriate, online tools are used to enhance knowledge both in school and as homework activities.   

Children are encouraged to apply numerical, statistical, measuring and geometric skills through cross curricular links during lessons in other curriculum areas.  

MFL

 

Purpose and Aims 

Learning a foreign language is a key to connecting and understanding global communities and provides an acceptance to other cultures. Spanish has been selected as it is the second most spoken language in the world (21 countries currently), and it is used in many forms of international communication. Our ambitious language education fosters pupils’ curiosity and deepens their understanding; preparing pupils to participate in a rapidly changing world where daily activities are increasingly carried out in other languages. Our teaching is immersive, allowing pupils to express their ideas and thoughts in another language and to understand and respond to its speakers, both in speech and in writing. The teaching of Spanish, which is predominately phonetic in its early stage, provides the foundation for learning further languages, equipping pupils to study and work in other countries.  

 

Organisation of the Curriculum  

The focus of study in Spanish is on practical communication. It enables pupils to make substantial progress in Spanish. The teaching provides an appropriate balance of spoken and written language, fostering a desire for life-long language study. 

By the time a pupil leaves KS2 at NET, they will be able to: 

  • understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of sources 
  • speak with increasing confidence and fluency, finding ways of communicating what they want to say, including through discussion and asking questions, and continually improving the accuracy of their pronunciation and intonation 
  • write at varying length, for different purposes and audiences, using the variety of grammatical structures that they have learnt 
  • discover and develop an appreciation of reading and writing in Spanish and be enthusiastically prepared for future language study. 

 

Planning and Assessment 

Abbotsweld uses the Hola Español as a scheme of work, which is enhanced with school planned cross-curricular cultural links. This scheme is a progressive framework of units which are built upon in a carefully sequenced way to support the development of a foreign language. Each unit introduces a new strand and vocabulary and there are revised stands and vocabulary elements within units to aid memory retention. Pupils are introduced to elements of grammar and phonics accordingly. This is a comprehensive programme, featuring online support to encourage accurate pronunciation. 

 

The curriculum is set into domains that pupils will be exposed to throughout their primary years. These key skills are: 

  • Listening 
  • Speaking 
  • Reading 
  • Writing 

MFL teaching begins in KS2 and pupils have opportunities for listening, speaking, reading and writing throughout each unit. Learning questions are devised for each unit and knowledge organisers contain essential vocabulary, grammar sheets and cultural information which are used for teacher and pupil support. Every lesson contains a recap and recall session, with elements of The Teacher Toolkit interwoven. 

The sequence of lessons builds on vocabulary and learning in a progressive format:  

 

Units are taught discretely but where links can be made to topics being taught they are, in order that our pupils make meaningful connections, whilst building up knowledge in their long term memory. For example, in geography, Mexican culture is explored when teaching this unit. 

 

Enrichment 

By enriching the curriculum we hope to provide extended learning opportunities for our children. Giving the pupils the chance to study concepts with greater depth, breadth and complexity, while also helping pupils to pursue their own areas of interest and strength.  

Enrichment may happen in a range of ways: 

Daily Greetings: Pupils are encouraged to answer the register and simple questions in Spanish daily. Lunch time is started with the Spanish greeting, ‘Buen Provecho’.  

Cultural Days: Pupils are exposed to cultural experiences, immersed in language, song, stories and traditions from Spanish speaking countries around the world  

Cultural Comparisons: Our pupils are given opportunities to learn about other cultures, traditions and festivals, for example Christmas and Halloween. They make comparisons between their country and those from around the world. 

Reading in Home Language: Parents are encouraged to visit the school as a Mystery Reader, whereby they can read a story from their own cultural heritage in their native language. 

 

Music

 

Purpose, Aims and Intent 

Music is universal, cultural, and individual. NET Academy Trust believes that every pupil should have the opportunity to receive a high-quality musical training in school, regardless of attainment, or background. The aim of music education is to help pupils to achieve a personal level of understanding, appreciation, and passion for music and to encourage children to be creative, caring, and enthusiastic members of our school community.  

At NET, our Music curriculums aims to ensure that all pupils: 

  • Are engaged and inspired to have a love of music embedded throughout all aspects of learning. 
  • Develop musical talents, aiding confidence, creativity and personal achievement. 
  • Learn to listen and appraise across a wide range of genres, compose and improvise using tuned and untuned instruments, and perform and share to a variety of audiences. 
  • Have complete accessibility to have a soulful happiness through expression and feeling. 

Music Skills Domains 

At NET Academies to be a pupil musician, pupils will have the opportunity to develop skills in the following domains – these will be apparent in all: 

  • Listening and appraising: Listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians. 
  • Theory of music: Applying knowledge of interrelated musical skills and notation with musical activities, singing and playing. 
  • Creating and exploring: Applying skills through improvisation and composition.  
  • Performing: Using skills and knowledge of music effectively to deliver performances. 

Based on the National Curriculum, the intent for both key stages 1 and 2 are as follows:  

Key stage 1 

Pupils should be taught to: 

  • use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes 
  • play tuned and untuned instruments musically 
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music 
  • experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music. 

Key stage 2 

Pupils should be taught to sing and play musically with increasing confidence and control. They should develop an understanding of musical composition, organising and manipulating ideas within musical structures and reproducing sounds from aural memory. 

Pupils should be taught to: 

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression 
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music 
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory 
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations 
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians 
  • develop an understanding of the history of music. 

Organisation of the Curriculum 

Our music curriculum is a combination of various publications and resources. 

There are 6 units per year for Years 1 to 6. Within EYFS, this is  

  • The Charanga Musical School Scheme provides week-by-week lessons for each year group in the school from ages 5-11. It provides lesson plans, assessment, clear progression, and engaging whiteboard resources for every lesson. The Scheme supports all the requirements of the national curriculum – this is the primary source of our curriculum. 
  • O-Generator is a music making tool developed by O-Music for use in Essex schools. It allows students to Create, Learn, Play and Perform Music at school, and at home as O-Generator runs as cloud software.  It is a simple and powerful way to learn and teach composition. Perfect for KS2. 
  • Ukulele Magic is the perfect tutor for children and for teachers. Rock to ragtime, bluegrass to swing, tango, calypso and the blues - they're all here in instantly accessible songs to play straight away.  The teacher's edition, contains a whiteboard e-book with embedded audio and video tutorials for every song. 
  • Various recorder tutor books are used, in combination with Charanga Recorder Scheme, to introduce the first six notes through a mixture of well-known and original tunes. Children are taught how to read standard notation, performing notes of different durations and dynamics using the correct technique. 

The strands of learning provide access to a wide range of genres throughout their time within the school. For EYFS, pupils within nursery will be exposed to a range of action songs and musical instruments. This is developed within reception as throughout the year units will be taught with a range of focus on musical progression and singing progression. The children will be progressing theory of music and knowledge through a consistent cycle of teaching – from reception (exploring traditional music and funk) pupils follow the Listening and appraising music -> Musical games -> Perform and share (assess) cycle – also see ‘Planning and Assessment’.  

Planning and Assessment

Planning is progressive across the year groups and to support long term memory skill domains are consistent and revisited throughout each key stage and each unit has learning questions. Although each unit has a different genre focus, skills and knowledge within music are built upon progressively. 

Carefully chosen units of work have a clear rationale for their positioning within the curriculum programme of staudy. Vocabulary, skills and knowledge are explicitly planned for, in each unit.

Pupils are supported in knowing, remembering, understanding and applying this through knowledge organisers, our teacher and learning policy/cycle and sequenced learning opportunities. Ongoing skill assessment will be used within the unit as well as the final outcome in which both skills and knowledge of the unit's content can be assessed through a final outcome.


Enrichment

The school partners with Essex Music Service. These provide specialist teachers for whole class units e.g. for those in Year 4 – ukuleles and African drumming. In addition the school also allocates spaces for Year 2 upwards in having the opportunity to access 1:1 or small group peripatetic lessons via the Essex music service. We also have a weekly choir within after school provision – the choir may also have opportunities to sing within events outside of school e.g. Young Voices concert, local performances. Each year group will also have the opportunity to take part in a performance to parents. 

 

Physical Education

 

Purpose, Aims and Intent 

The aim of Physical Education is to inspire all pupils to partake, be active, try new skills, live a healthy lifestyle and excel in competitive sport and other physically demanding activities as well as being physically confident in non-competitive situations.  

All pupils’ experiences of Physical Education is enhanced by The Pupil Athlete Pathway. Both within and external to the PE Curriculum. 

 By the end of key stage 2 at NET they will be able to: 

  • Reflect on a range of opportunities that they have had. Engage in and enjoy PE and Sport beyond the classroom.
  • Have physical skills, cognitive understanding and confidence, to achieve success in competitive and non-competitive activities.
  • Articulate and show a physically and mentally healthy lifestyle.
  • Interact, empathise with and treat with respect, individuals in all participatory roles.  
  •  

Based on the National Curriculum, 

 

Key stage 1 Pupils should be taught to:    

  • master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities 
  • participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending  
  • perform dances using simple movement patterns. 
  •  

Key stage 2 Pupils should be taught to 

  • use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination  
  • play competitive games, modified where appropriate [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis], and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending  
  • develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and gymnastics] 
  • perform dances using a range of movement patterns  
  • take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team 
  • compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best 

 
Organisation of the curriculum 

Each year group from year 1-6 completes 12 units over the course of the year. This equates to two units each half term. In EYFS PE is taught discreetly weekly and continuously through our provision. 'Fundamental Movement' and 'The ABCs of Movement' are intertwined throughout these as well as ‘Object Manipulation’. PE makes use of guidance within the Development Matters document to help reach the expected level of development by planning lessons and steps to success based on the learning statements provided.  

Each unit of work is linked to strands which are repeated in each key stage to support retention and progress within PE. 

Enrichment 

The Pupil Athlete Pathway is underpinned by the principles that sport should be accessible for all our pupils and that different pupils need to experience PE at different levels, or for different reasons whether this be for positive mental well-being, a love of sport or the desire to compete and lead. Ranging from exposure to new sports and participating in extra-curricular clubs to playing for a school team or refereeing a tournament, as part of the Pupil Athlete Pathway our pupils are given the opportunity to experience new concepts, develop their knowledge and progress their understanding to levels of greater depth that they can take beyond their time at school. 

 
Each unit of work has been carefully linked to a sportsperson through our Athlete Profiles. These Athlete Profiles become less mainstream as the curriculum progresses. They give an overview biography and links to how pupils can enhance their interest through participation or spectating. 

As part of Sense of SELF and Pupil Athlete Pathway there is a range of extra-curricular opportunities that are regularly reviewed and updated. These include clubs, level 1 competitions including Winter and Summer Sports Days, level 2 competitions and school leadership opportunities including Sports Council and Play Leaders. 

Planning and Assessment 

 Planning is progressive across the year groups. To support long term memory, skill domains and strands of PE are consistent and revisted throughout each key stage. Each unit is sequenced through a series of learning questions. These learning questions follow out PE specific sequence...

Carefully chosen units of work have a rationale for their positioning within the programme of study. This is set out in our 'why here, why now' documentation. Vocabulary, skills and knowledge are explicitly planned for.

Pupils are supported in knowing, remembering, understanding and applying through our teaching and learning policy/cycle.

Assessment is retrieval, ongoing and outcome based. The skills are mapped explicitly. 

 

Relationships, Sex and Health Education

 

Purpose, Aims and Intent 

At NET Academies, our RSE curriculum is continually developing and meets the national curriculum requirements of… 

Families and people who care for me 

Pupils should know: 

  • that families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability 
  • the characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives 
  • that others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care 
  • that stable, caring relationships, which may be of different types, are at the heart of happy families, and are important for children’s security as they grow up 
  • that marriage represents a formal and legally recognised commitment of two people to each other which is intended to be lifelong 
  • how to recognise if family relationships are making them feel unhappy or unsafe, and how to seek help or advice from others if needed C

 

Caring Friendships

Pupils should know: 

  • how important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends 
  • the characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties 
  • that healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded 
  • that most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right 
  • how to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed 

 

  • Respectful relationships 

    Pupils should know: 

  • the importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs 
  • practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships 
  • the conventions of courtesy and manners 
  • the importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness 
  • that in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority 
  • about different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help 
  • what a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive 
  • the importance of permission-seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults 

Online relationships 

Pupils should know: 

  • that people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not 
  • that the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to-face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous 
  • the rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them 
  • how to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met 
  • how information and data is shared and used online 

 

Being safe 

Pupils should know: 

  • what sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context) 
  • about the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe 
  • that each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact 
  • how to respond safely and appropriately to adults they may encounter (in all contexts, including online) whom they do not know 
  • how to recognise and report feelings of being unsafe or feeling bad about any adult 
  • how to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard, 
  • how to report concerns or abuse, and the vocabulary and confidence needed to do so 
  • where to get advice, for example family, school or other sources 

At NET Academies, although not statutory we teach Sex Education under the heading Growing and Changing. Parents are informed of the content annually and invited to discuss any content with the school. 

 

Organisation of the Curriculum 

There are 7 units per year for EYFS to year 6. These include: 

Our Relationships 

Life Online 

Positive Wellbeing 

Citizenship 

Economic Wellbeing 

Physical Development 

Growing and Changing 

The RSHE Curriculum is taught by the class teacher and supported by SLT where necessary. 

Each unit overview gives suggested stimulus, activities, texts and links but autonomy of planning is ensured to meet the needs of individual cohorts to meet the learning question(s) and outcomes. 

 

Planning and Assessment 

Planning is progressive across the year groups and to support long term memory strands are consistent and revisited throughout each key stage and each unit has suggested learning questions and outcomes.  

Pupils are supported in knowing, remembering, understanding and applying this throug our teaching and learning policy/cycle and sequenced learning questions. 

Ongoing and retrieval assessment will be used within the unit as well as across units. 

Enrichment/Parental Support

 

https://learning.nspcc.org.uk/research-resources/schools/relationships-health-and-sex-education-resources https://www.nspcc.org.uk/keeping-children-safe/online-safety/ 

https://saferinternet.org.uk/guide-and-resource/parents-and-carers 

https://learning.nspcc.org.uk/safeguarding-child-protection-schools/promoting-healthy-relationships  

 Religion and World Views

Purpose, Aims and Intent: 

At NET, our RE curriculum aims to ensure that all pupils acquire and develop knowledge and understanding of the principal religions represented in the UK: 

  • to appreciate the way that religious beliefs shape our life and behaviour
  • to develop the ability to make reasoned and informed judgements about religious and moral issues
  • to promote respect and open-mindedness towards others of different faiths and beliefs
  • to enhance their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development

 

The key driver is to engage pupils in an enquiry approach where they can develop an understanding and appreciation for the expression of beliefs, cultural practices and influence of religions and worldviews in the local, national and wider global community.

Organisation of the Curriculum: 

R&W Skills Domains 

At NET Academies to be a theologian, pupils will have the opportunity to develop skills in the following domains:  

 

Three strands in R&W run throughout the whole curriculum: 

Know About and Understand           Express and Communicate                Gain and Deploy Skills  

Early Years

Key learning experiences

A number of key learning experiences have been identified which should be regarded as entitlements for all pupils in the EYFS:

  • Activities based on first-hand experience.
  • Opportunities for play and learning that acknowledge children’s particular religious and non-religious beliefs and cultural backgrounds.
  • Activities that help children to become aware of, explore and question issues of difference in religion and culture.
  • Activities that promote emotional, moral, spiritual and social development alongside intellectual development.
  • Positive images in, for example, books and displays that challenge children’s thinking and help them to embrace differences in religion and culture.

 

Key Stage One

 

Key learning experiences

A number of key learning experiences have been identified which should be regarded as entitlements for all pupils at Key Stage 1.

Characteristics of Effective Teaching and Learning

These experiences promote the ‘Characteristics of Effective Teaching and Learning’ - displayed through playing and exploring, Active learning, and Creating and thinking critically.

 

Opportunities provide pupils with:

  • Visit places of worship, focusing on symbols and feelings.
  • Listen and respond to visitors from local faith communities.
  • Use their senses and have times of quiet reflection.
  • Use art and design, music, dance and drama to develop their creative talents and imagination.
  • Share their own beliefs, ideas and values and talk about their feelings and experiences.
  • Begin to use ICT to explore religions and beliefs as practised in the local and wider community.

 

Key Stage Two 

Pupils learn about Christianity, other principal religions and Humanism, recognising the impact of religion and belief on individuals and society locally, nationally and globally. They also develop awareness of the fact that many people’s beliefs change in the light of their life experiences. This is done in a spirit of respect and open-mindedness, so that barriers, misunderstandings and prejudices are broken down while critical awareness is retained. Pupils make connections between different aspects of religion and consider various forms of religious expression, including the use of symbols. They consider some of the beliefs, teachings, practices and ways of life that are central to religion. In doing this, pupils go beyond the informative, engaging feelings and imagination so as to display a degree of empathy with 

different believers. They learn about sacred texts and consider their meanings. They begin to recognise diversity in religion, learning about similarities and differences both within and between religions and belief systems. They extend the range and use of specialist vocabulary. They recognise the challenges involved in distinguishing between ideas of right and wrong, and valuing what is good and true. They communicate their ideas, recognising other people’s viewpoints. They engage at a personal level with important life questions. They consider their own beliefs, values, and those of others in the light of their learning in RE 

 

At NET we follow 'exploRE', the Essex agreed syllabus for Religious Education, selecting the following religions for study:

Christianity 

Islam

Judaism 

Hinduism

Buddhism 

Sikhism 

Humanism (KS2)

 

Planning and Assessment: 

Progression in R&W depends upon the development of the following generic learning skills applied to R&W: share, relate, respond sensitively, describe, connect, show understanding, apply, explain and express views. Progress in R&W is dependent upon the development and application of the skills outlined in our curriculum document. These skills develop a range of activities for pupils to demonstrate their capabilities in R&W. Similarly, teachers will move pupils on from knowledge accumulation and work that is merely descriptive to higher level thinking and more sophisticated skills.

Teachers will deploy ongoing skills assessment within each unit, in addition to the final outcome objectives, to record progress and learning effectively.  

Enrichment

Our curriculum is enriched by visits to a range of Places of Worship; chosen to foster a sense of awe and wonder. We invite visitors into the school to talk to children about their knowledge/experience regarding a particular faith thus giving our children a deeper understanding of belief and faith. 

 

Science

 

Purpose, Aims and Intent

At NET, our Science curriculums aims to ensure that all pupils: 

  • Children will be taught the knowledge and skills to provide a secure foundation in ‘Understanding the World’ through the disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. 
  • Science is fundamental to understanding our lives and our futures and as such, it is a core subject. 
  • As scientists, children will develop their natural curiosity, questioning and evaluation of the world they live in. 
  • Children are ‘progressively’ taught skills to develop scientific enquiry to enable them to plan, predict, conduct and conclude investigations independently. 

At the end of KS2, pupils will be able to: 

  • Ask and answer questions about scientific enquiry. 
  • Make predictions based on their prior scientific learning. 
  • Carry out investigations, observing over time; pattern seeking; identifying, classifying and grouping and conducting comparative and fair testing. 
  • Interpret evidence and explain findings using their science knowledge and technical vocabulary 

 

Organisation of the Curriculum

We aim to teach children conceptually in order to develop a deeper level of understanding throughout the children’s time at school. Teachers will impart essential knowledge that has been planned progressively, through the NET curriculum, beginning in EYFS and across key stage one and two.  

Scientific Strands: 

Strands in science continue throughout the whole curriculum: Biology, Chemistry, Physics 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

The study of living organisms, and their local and wider environment; understanding our bodies and the changes we experience. 

The study of the properties of different states of matters and how they undergo changes. 

The study of matter and energy and how they interact; including light electricity and forces 

This planned knowledge will include vocabulary and concepts. The concepts will build upon one another year after year and refer to one another over time. 

 The progression of skills is illustrated in our Skills document. This document lists all the scientific skills that are covered in each of the units and shows how they are developed though a child’s learning journey. It also lists the rationale of the units – why that knowledge and those skills are taught at that time of the academic year, and at that stage in the child’s schooling.  

 

The skills are split into 4 different domains: Questioning, Planning and Enquiring; Investigating; Observing and Recording; Concluding and Evaluating.  

Planning and Assessment

  

Pupils regularly retrieve knowledge from memory to help them remember and organise their knowledge. This is coupled with feedback. Teachers think carefully about what pupils are being asked to retrieve and whether this prioritises the most important content. 

Systems are in place to support teachers to make accurate decisions when assessing pupils’ work. This includes supporting teachers with statutory teacher assessment of science at key stage 1 and 2.  

Quizzes undertaken at the beginning and end of each topic, to monitor knowledge gained throughout the unit.   

KWL activities.  

Recap and Recall at the beginning of each lesson, to recall knowledge learnt in previous lessons, units and year groups.  

Mini Plenaries during lessons to assess knowledge gained.  

‘Three-part Plenary’ at the end of each lesson to  challenge children to question beyond their learning and discuss what they could be learning next – how could they extend their knowledge further?  

Book monitoring/Pupil Book Studies. 

Enrichment

  • Science focuses on developing scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of Biology, Chemistry and Physics.  
  • All children have many opportunities to develop their understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of scientific enquiries; encouraging curiosity. This culminates in an annual Science Day. 
  • Students are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future – including many interdisciplinary opportunities.  
  • Developing a culture of science as a creative learning process, enabling children to approach unfamiliar real-life problems with confidence and resilience.   

 

Noticeboard

Welcome to the new Abbotsweld Website.

Our new website has a vibrant design along with intuitive and consistent site-wide navigation, following the family look of the NET Academies Trust. It is also fully responsive to mobile devices, making it easy to navigate on a wide range of web browsers and devices.

We have improved the structure of our content so you can find the information you require with ease. There’s a whole host of smaller but impactful changes to make your experience of the site much better.

This website is organic and we will continue to develop it further to suit everyone's needs. It will always be an evolving work in progress. We look forward to watching it grow and hope that you find it useful and enjoy browsing it.